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Marionette Executable Release v0.6.0

Wed 13 Jan 2016

I have just released a new version of the Marionette, well the executable that you need to download.

The main fixes in this release is the ability to speak to Firefox and get meaningful error messages. This was a slight oversight on our part to make sure that we don't run commands out of sync. We have also added in getPageSource. This "native" call runs in the browser instead of trying to do it in the JavaScript sandbox which is what a number of the drivers were attempting. This will be added to the specification very soon.

I have also landed the update to interactions to the specification. This reads much better and has prose that makes it implementable. I suspect as the likes of Google and Microsoft start looking to implement it there will be bugs that need fixing.

Since you are awesome early adopters it would be great if we could raise bugs.

I am not expecting everything to work but below is a quick list that I know doesn't work.

  • No support for self-signed certificates
  • No support for actions
  • No support logging endpoint
  • I am sure there are other things we don't remember

Switching of Frames needs to be done with either a WebElement or an index. Windows can only be switched by window handles. This is currently how it has been discussed in the specification.

If in doubt, raise bugs!

Thanks for being an early adopter and thanks for raising bugs as you find them!

    Area: blog

Public Source vs Open Source

Mon 11 Jan 2016

A few weeks ago I had an interesting conversation on twitter and then on instant messaging about a bit of software that was open sourced. Some thought, and might still do, the new piece of software might not be supported.

There was also recently a good blog post from James Long about how it can be hard to create open source code and then maintain it. Either life gets in the way or another project gets in the way.

I have always had a different view of code to most people. The idea is simple, at least in my head.

Open Source

The idea of Open Source has changed over the years and this has meant the original meaning is not quite right. Open Source has started to have a certain aspect of community involved, from people submitting patches (PRs on Github).

Projects that have been around for a very long time have organically grown some kind of community. These tend to be people who believe in the project or see other people working on it that they get to know. We see meet ups forming as more an more people get involved.

This is best part of be source code! The openness with people and code all wrapped up in one!

However, not all code out in the open will achieve this! (And this is fine, not all pieces of code need to have community. Imagine if every package on NPM had a meet up!?!?).

Public Source

Public source everything that open source has minus all community side of things. A really good example of Public Source is Android. You can see all the code, you derive your own work but want to submit a patch? Well Cryogen might take it but Google, seemingly, don't care.

Also, most projects on Github probably fall under this category. Especially if the person is a starter and not a maintainer, to use James' concept.

The thing to remember is that everyone wins when the code is in the public but before you start getting all hung up on "support" from people who have given up the code, and their time, to put it out there remember that open source needs to grow from public source!

    Area: blog

The "power" of overworking

Mon 04 Jan 2016

The other week I was in Orlando, Florida for a Mozilla All-Hands. It is a week where around 1200 Mozillians get together to spend time with each other planning, coding, or solving some hard problems.

One of the topics that came up was how someone always seemed to be online. This comment was a little more than "they never seem to go offline from IRC". It was "they seem to commenting on things around 20 hours a day". Overworking is a simple thing to do and when you love your job you can easily be pulled into this trap.

I use the word trap and I mean it!

If you are overworking you put yourself into this state where people come to expect that you will overwork. If you overwork, and have a manager who doesn't notice that you are overworking, when you do normal hours they begin to think that you are slacking. If you do have a manager who is telling you to stop overdoing it, you might then have colleagues who don't notice that you work all the hours. They then expect you to do be this machine, doing everything and more. And those colleagues that notice you doing too many hours start to think your manager is a poor manager for not helping you have a good work/life balance.

At this point, everyone is starting to lose. You are not being as productive as your could be. Studies have shown that working more than 40 hours a week only marginally increases productivity and this only lasts for a few weeks before productivity drops below the productivity you would have if you worked 40 hours a week.

The reasons for overworking can be numerous but the one that regularly stands out is imposter syndrome. "If I work 50 hours a week then people won't see me fail because I will hopefully have fixed it in time". This is a fallacy, people are happy to wait for problems to be fixed as long as it is in hand. Having one person be responsible for fixing things is a road to ruin. A good team is measured by how quickly they help colleagues. If you fall, there will be 2 people there to pick you up.

Before you start working more than 40 hours a week start thinking about the people this is going to impact. This is not only your colleagues, who start having to clean up technical debt, but your personal life. It is also your loved ones who are impacted. Missing an anniversary, a birthday, a dance/music recital. Work is never worth missing that!

If you are working more than 40 hours I suggest bringing this up in your next 1:1. Your manager will appreciate that you are doing some self care (if they are good managers) and work with you in making changes to your workload. They could be over promising their team and need to get this under control.

    Area: blog

A new Marionette version available for Selenium Users with Java, .NET and Ruby support

Wed 07 Oct 2015

If you have been wanting to use Marionette but couldn't because you don't work in Python now is your chance to do so! Well, if you are a Java User, .NET and Ruby you can use it too!! All the latest downloads of the Marionette executable are available from our development github repository releases page. We will be moving this to the Mozilla organization the closer we get to a full release.

There is also a new page on MDN that walks you through the process of setting up Marionette and using it. There are examples for all the language bindings currently supported.

Since you are awesome early adopters it would be great if we could raise bugs.

I am not expecting everything to work but below is a quick list that I know doesn't work.

  • No support for self-signed certificates
  • No support for actions
  • No support logging endpoint
  • getPageSource not available. This will be added in at a later stage, it was a slightly contentious part in the specification.
  • I am sure there are other things we don't remember

Switching of Frames needs to be done with either a WebElement or an index. Windows can only be switched by window handles. This is currently how it has been discussed in the specification.

If in doubt, raise bugs!

Thanks for being an early adopter and thanks for raising bugs as you find them!

    Area: blog

Another Marionette release! Now with Windows Support!

Thu 30 Jul 2015

If you have been wanting to use Marionette but couldn't because you only work on Windows, now is your chance to do so! All the latest downloads are available from our development github repository releases page

There is also a new page on MDN that walks you through the process of setting up Marionette and using it. I have only updated the python bindings so I can get a fell for how people are using it

Since you are awesome early adopters it would be great if we could raise bugs.

I am not expecting everything to work but below is a quick list that I know doesn't work.

  • No support for self-signed certificates
  • No support for actions
  • No support logging endpoint
  • getPageSource not available. This will be added in at a later stage, it was a slightly contentious part in the specification.
  • I am sure there are other things we don't remember

Switching of Frames needs to be done with either a WebElement or an index. Windows can only be switched by window handles. This is currently how it has been discussed in the specification.

If in doubt, raise bugs!

Thanks for being an early adopter and thanks for raising bugs as you find them!

    Area: blog